Posts

Showing posts from February, 2014

How to Do a Joint Venture Marketing Deal

Image
From time to time I get emails from people with topics that run the gamut. Some ask me for marketing advice, others just write to say hello, some people flat out challenge and criticize me. I was particularly amused with a message I got today from Tammy, a very angry person who is not a fan of my joint venture marketing ideas. (Tammy didn't say what camp she's affiliated or where it is).

 Apparently Tammy doesn't believe I practice what I preach. Here's what she said:


"Hello Eric, Most of the stuff on your blog is very good information, and truth be told I've used a number of your ideas to help increase my camp enrollment. But I'm calling your bluff on the notion of joint venture marketing -- specifically the "4th Commandment" of your recent "10 Commandments of Summer Camp Marketing" post and the numerous other times you've tried to jam joint venture marketing strategy down our throats. I have tried approaching two companies in my t…

34 Sentences To Use in Your Sales Copy That Will Leave Your Reader Wanting More

When you publish written content, you probably have a goal (or several goals) you want to accomplish. You want the reader prospect to take some kind of action, like call you, email you, text you, click a link, fill out a form, whatever.

As you probably know, the headline is the most important part of your written sales piece. But if you've got a multi-paragraph sales letter, it doesn't do you any good if someone only reads a paragraph or two. To really max-out your selling opportunity, you want them to read the whole thing. How do you do that?

You need to write the the final sentence of each paragraph in such a compelling way it leads the reader to want to hear more. The last sentence of each paragraph needs to "leave them hanging" so they feel like not reading the next paragraph will make them miss something important.

Let me give you a few examples of some sentences you can use in your sales copy that will carry your prospects into each next paragraph of your …